Radnor Fire Company
Radnor Fire Company
Radnor Fire Company

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2017 Call Volume Stats
Fire EMS
Jan 55 221
Feb 42 178
Mar 54 187
Apr 57 186
May 59 185
Jun 70 181
Jul 65 161
Aug
Sep
Oct
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Dec
Total 402 1299

Past Call Volume Stats
Fire EMS
2016 780 2424
2015 774 2351
2014 848 2287

Carbon Monoxide Safety Information
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By Newsdesk
December 19, 2016

Often called the silent killer, carbon monoxide is an invisible, odorless, colorless gas created when fuels (such as gasoline, wood, coal, natural gas, propane, oil, and methane) burn incompletely. In the home, heating and cooking equipment that burn fuel can be sources of carbon monoxide.

> CO alarms should be installed in a central location outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home and in other locations where required by applicable laws, codes or standards. For the best protection, interconnect all CO alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.

> Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for placement and mounting height.

> Choose a CO alarm that has the label of a recognized testing laboratory.

> Test CO alarms at least once a month; replace them according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

> If the audible trouble signal sounds, check for low batteries. If the battery is low, replace it. If it still sounds, call the fire department.

> If the CO alarm sounds, immediately move to a fresh air location outdoors or by an open window or door. Make sure everyone inside the home is accounted for. Call for help from a fresh air location and stay there until emergency personnel.

> If you need to warm a vehicle, remove it from the garage immediately after starting it. Do not run a vehicle or other fueled engine or motor indoors, even if garage doors are open. Make sure the exhaust pipe of a running vehicle is not
covered with snow.

> A generator should be used in a well-ventilated location outdoors away from windows, doors and vent openings.

> Gas or charcoal grills can produce CO — only use outside.

Source: National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) / www.nfpa.org

A person can be poisoned by a small amount of CO over a longer period of time or by a large amount of CO over a shorter amount of time.
A person can be poisoned by a small amount of CO over a longer period of time or by a large amount of CO over a shorter amount of time.
 

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Radnor Fire Company
121 South Wayne Ave.
Wayne, PA 19087
Emergency Dial 911
Business: 610-687-3245 ext. 10
Station Fax: 610-687-8578
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